The Meme Generation


  1. ☛ UPDATED: Avery Edison Detained at Toronto's Pearson Airport

    whileyouweresleeping:

    atsween:

    Here you go. Let’s boost the signal people. I’ll try and add details as I get them.

    Ignorance means a pre-op trans woman can be referred to as “he” by immigration officers, despite being identified as female on her passport, then end up in solitary confinement at a male prison, because she would get beat up in a cell with other inmates.

    Sharing this because lack of training and a problematic law are now hurting a friend. Please help get the word out. 

    — From NYC.

  2. So excited for the sports this weekend!

    So excited for the sports this weekend!

  3. Can I say a curse word? I hate it! And, he’s stealing Doctor Strange’s move!!!

    My Daughter, a still-mourning 11th Doctor fanatic, upon seeing the new Capaldi costume.

    (Understand: My wife and I both like it; it’s our 6-year-old kid who’s livid)

    As someone who grew up with Tom Baker as The Doctor and had no idea that there’d been any previous incarnations, nor that there’d be a replacement, I can empathize. You never forget your first Doctor.

  4. everythinginthesky:

The general theory of relativity allows that Tim Travel is technically possible but modern physicists agree that the paradoxes caused by traveling back in Tim make it untenable.

    everythinginthesky:

    The general theory of relativity allows that Tim Travel is technically possible but modern physicists agree that the paradoxes caused by traveling back in Tim make it untenable.

  5. Fox is singularly obsessed with the dangers of “feminization.” The issue is not that men have been emasculated by feminists or are disoriented by a “feminized” environment. It’s that we haven’t taught boys why it’s ok and important to adapt.  It is that we fail, time and again, and for decades, to entertain serious questions about masculinity as culturally informed. Our media (excuse me, just clearing my throat a bit) continues to rigidly refuse to discuss the ways in which American ideas of masculinity have failed to adapt to our changing society, economy and culture. That’s not feminization, it’s stubborn and destructive nostalgia for uncontested dominance.
  6. Because the Social Progress Index measures comprehensive social outcomes directly, separately from economic indicators, we are able for the first time to examine the relationship between GDP per capita and social progress. Previously, the assumption has been that economic growth improves well-being. We find that rising GDP per capita, indeed, is correlated with improving social progress, but the connection is far from automatic. For a similar level of GDP, we find that some countries achieve a much higher level of social progress than others. For example, Costa Rica achieves much greater success than South Africa in terms of social progress.
  7. adam-wola:

In which my private e-mail communications get reprinted by a government newspaper in Ecuador

Now, this is just gross: the text of one of my private e-mails has been published in an Ecuadorian government newspaper. In an article that portrays me as part of a conspiracy that, were it to exist, I’d be proud to participate in.

Here’s what happened. In July, I got a note from Gonzalo Guillén, a Colombian journalist known for his investigations into alleged ties between politicians — including ex-President Álvaro Uribe — and organized crime. He asked if I could meet with Martha Roldós, an Ecuadorian opposition politician and environmental activist, who was visiting Washington and considering launching an independent media outlet in her country.

We had lunch. Ms. Roldós said that the situation of independent journalists had grown very serious in Ecuador, that it was very difficult to do reporting without a civil or criminal response from the government, and that the intelligence services had increased their surveillance of independent journalists. (Shortly after, I recorded a podcast about press freedom in Ecuador with Carlos Lauría of the Committee to Protect Journalists.)

Ms. Roldós said that, along with a group of reporters, she was planning to found an independent “new media” outlet along the lines of Colombia’s La Silla Vacía or El Salvador’s El Faro. This sounded like a good idea, so I sent an e-mail to a colleague at the Open Society Foundations, which has supported these and other independent Latin American Internet newspapers, recommending they meet.

Well, last month Ms. Roldós had her e-mail account hacked. The hackers were most likely affiliated with the Ecuadorian government, because the content of my e-mail to Open Society showed up in a government-owned newspaper, the Guayaquíl-based El Telégrafo. (That this happened certainly confirms a lot of what Ms. Roldós told me at that lunch.)

The article features a graphic with my picture, taken from WOLA’s website, as part of a sinister circle including Ms. Roldós, Mr. Guillén, David Holiday at OSF, other Ecuadorian journalists critical of the government, and even the National Endowment for Democracy, the U.S. government agency to whom—according to her hacked emails—Ms. Roldós was also applying for support.

The article portrays NED as some sort of CIA front. While the agency has murky cold-war origins, its priorities have long since shifted. In 2011-2012, one of NED’s fellows was Colombian investigative journalist Hollman Morris, a frequent target of vicious verbal attacks from Colombia’s right wing.

I certainly stand by what I wrote in the email, and I’m delighted to be depicted as a member of such an illustrious group. But I’m absolutely furious that the content of my private communications has been published without my consent. By a government paper, no less.

The article reflects well on me. But it reflects very poorly on Ecuador’s government.

    adam-wola:

    In which my private e-mail communications get reprinted by a government newspaper in Ecuador

    Now, this is just gross: the text of one of my private e-mails has been published in an Ecuadorian government newspaper. In an article that portrays me as part of a conspiracy that, were it to exist, I’d be proud to participate in.

    Here’s what happened. In July, I got a note from Gonzalo Guillén, a Colombian journalist known for his investigations into alleged ties between politicians — including ex-President Álvaro Uribe — and organized crime. He asked if I could meet with Martha Roldós, an Ecuadorian opposition politician and environmental activist, who was visiting Washington and considering launching an independent media outlet in her country.

    We had lunch. Ms. Roldós said that the situation of independent journalists had grown very serious in Ecuador, that it was very difficult to do reporting without a civil or criminal response from the government, and that the intelligence services had increased their surveillance of independent journalists. (Shortly after, I recorded a podcast about press freedom in Ecuador with Carlos Lauría of the Committee to Protect Journalists.)

    Ms. Roldós said that, along with a group of reporters, she was planning to found an independent “new media” outlet along the lines of Colombia’s La Silla Vacía or El Salvador’s El Faro. This sounded like a good idea, so I sent an e-mail to a colleague at the Open Society Foundations, which has supported these and other independent Latin American Internet newspapers, recommending they meet.

    Well, last month Ms. Roldós had her e-mail account hacked. The hackers were most likely affiliated with the Ecuadorian government, because the content of my e-mail to Open Society showed up in a government-owned newspaper, the Guayaquíl-based El Telégrafo. (That this happened certainly confirms a lot of what Ms. Roldós told me at that lunch.)

    The article features a graphic with my picture, taken from WOLA’s website, as part of a sinister circle including Ms. Roldós, Mr. Guillén, David Holiday at OSF, other Ecuadorian journalists critical of the government, and even the National Endowment for Democracy, the U.S. government agency to whom—according to her hacked emails—Ms. Roldós was also applying for support.

    The article portrays NED as some sort of CIA front. While the agency has murky cold-war origins, its priorities have long since shifted. In 2011-2012, one of NED’s fellows was Colombian investigative journalist Hollman Morris, a frequent target of vicious verbal attacks from Colombia’s right wing.

    I certainly stand by what I wrote in the email, and I’m delighted to be depicted as a member of such an illustrious group. But I’m absolutely furious that the content of my private communications has been published without my consent. By a government paper, no less.

    The article reflects well on me. But it reflects very poorly on Ecuador’s government.

  8. ☛ A Huge, Neon, Sign Blinking “DANGER AHEAD”

    The first sign of the Dream’s failure I’ve been able to find, occurred in the 1970′s, when the median income of American men flat-lined.  The numbers show the decline in a very straight forward way (inflation adjusted dollars):

    • In 1972, the median income was  $36,567
    • In 2012, the median income was  $33,904

    In sum, Americans make less today than they did in 1972!  By income alone, the US hasn’t seen an iota of economic improvement in over four decades.

  9. For those catching up, would this be the correct order?

EDIT: Are there separate “Day of the Doctor” and “THE Day of the Doctor” episodes? They have different run times and synopses.

    For those catching up, would this be the correct order?

    EDIT: Are there separate “Day of the Doctor” and “THE Day of the Doctor” episodes? They have different run times and synopses.

  10. Hi there. Thanks for taking my call. Long time listener, first time caller.

    My question is that I set up my DVR to record Dr. Who without realizing there was a marathon coming up and it deleted everything else to make room and now all my kids’ and wife’s shows are gone and can I stay with you for a few days until this all blows over? Thanks, I’ll take my answer off the air.

  11. (via Shorpy Historical Photo Archive :: Office Xmas Party: 1925)
  12. chaztoo:

I had to get this out of my head so I could move on with my life.

I almost forgot to reblog this this year.

    chaztoo:

    I had to get this out of my head so I could move on with my life.

    I almost forgot to reblog this this year.

  13. Oh, this is gonna be fun, Siri.

    Oh, this is gonna be fun, Siri.